Marathon Monday: Racing Thoughts

Well, lookie here…it’s Monday again, already! I planned on bringing my training plan along with me this morning to post this week’s training schedule and in my infinite Monday forgetfulness, it’s sitting there on my nightstand! So, here’s what I can remember at the moment πŸ˜‰

M – 5 MILES, AHR* (average heart rate / Long Run pace)

T – REST

W – 8 MILES, AHR

TH – 4 MILES, AHR

F – REST

S – 15 MILES, AHR

SUN – 3 TO 4, AHR

Heading into week 2 with my training plan, I’m feeling pretty good. I missed my mileage goals for last week, with the 10K modification (though the PR was nice) and then some lingering lethargy from that happy fun time of the month πŸ˜‰
I hit this week running (literally) though this morning with a nice 5 mile run in the brisk morning air. I can not say enough good things about the NB hat + RoadNoise vest – in fact, I sense a post coming soon on these early morning run essentials soon!

While I am talking about running, I just wanted to add a few more thoughts I had on my training cycle now; as well as ask for some feedback. See, I am definitely proud of my 10K this weekend, but I cannot help but wonder if I am not racing to my full potential – but honestly, when the marathon is my priority, should I be all-out racing shorter distances? Am I being too safe about my racing? When is the time to push my limits? SO MANY QUESTIONS!

I’ve learned a lot about myself through running, and it is interesting to see how lessons learned can be applied to life / and how personality attributes (like always playing it safe) reflect in my running habits at times, too. But – when is it best to take chances? Share your thoughts with me!

 

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16 thoughts on “Marathon Monday: Racing Thoughts

  1. Love that shirt! I take chances all of the time… I have to tell myself to play it safe and well, I’m not a good listener. I think running is having the wisdom to know when to take chances and when to play it safe … balance and, listening to your body.

    • Great thoughts, Lisa! I think it’s good to have the balance, too…like the tiny angel/devil thing πŸ˜‰

  2. Congrats on your race this past weekend… looks like you’re doing the right stuff. As for the shirt, well, it’s like an equation. Outcome = (Feelings x Value) – (Risk + Potential Regret)… or something. Just making something up on a Monday morning. πŸ˜‰

    • Hehe, Julie – that’s why I am so glad to be friends with someone as smart as you! I like that equation πŸ™‚

  3. I’m sort of a “rule follower” and like to play it safe as much as I can. I don’t try to be that way; it’s just my comfort zone, I think! It’s definitely good to challenge and test ourselves from time to time tho!! That’s what makes us grow! Great perspective!! Spa love!

  4. I think racing during training is very important. I think the adjustment is just as much mental as it is physical. Racing at marathon goal pace or slightly faster will help you come race day; but you also don’t want to over-race as that can wear on your physically, as well as adding stress thinking about what you’re doing too much. Last summer I was guilty of racing as many races as I could; this summer I’ve narrowed down the races, but put an intense focus on what I want to do for each one, all with the big picture in mind. For example, my half marathon in October will not be a 100% race — it will probably be 90% effort to hone in on what marathon pace feels like for a longer period of time.

    • Thanks for your advice, David! It’s sometimes hard to figure out the best strategies.

      With my 10K time from this weekend, I felt very on track for my B goal for the marathon, since it felt good and matched up perfectly with my recent 20K time, as well as my 1/2 marathon PR (that was kind of creepy but also awesome). I am glad to keep moving forward!!

  5. Yeah for the 10K PR. I personally see no reason NOT to race. Marathon Cycle #3 is different for me because I’ve incorporated races into my long runs, and for me they’ve helped make it more fun, plus it mimics how marathon day will be. Last week I raced a 5K on Sat and then raced a half-marathon the next day and felt fine. (PRed in both) What effects me is how many days I run/mileage. I can’t pile a ton of mile the weekend before a race or I will get tired/burned out. I want that NB hat!!!

    • Thanks, girl! Nice work on your recent PRs! Are you still planning on being at Stonewall Jackson?

  6. Nice 10K time! Congrats to you and your husband! I race the heck out of every distance but that’s because sometimes it’s hard to suppress my competitive side. Sometimes it’s nice to run short and fast and sometimes it’s nice to slow down and go longer. I can’t see why we can’t have it all!

    • Thanks, Madison! You race the heck out of every distance because your are Ms Speedy!!!! πŸ˜€

  7. I like to race as hard as possible during all race especially during training. It is a good indicator of how well your training is working and it also gives you confidence to plug in your time to a calculator such as McMillan to see if your shorts races are indicative of the marathon pace you are shooting for. My short races say I should run a faster marathon than my goals so I feel comfortable shooting for my marathon goal pace.

    And congrats on your 10k!!!!!

    • Thanks for your insight, Robin! I checked McMillan and creepily enough, all my race paces are DEAD ON for my B marathon goal, which is pretty crazy. Like, exacts.

  8. I don’t think there are any easy answers there! I think it’s completely fine to race hard…to a point. Pick a time (like 5 or 6 weeks out) when you’ll stop doing it an let your body cope – those last few weeks are HARD, and going flat out at a shorter race might wear you down. That said, it’s all about listening to your body right?! Whatever feels good – do it!

    Oh – and I just read a great article about how important it is to have easy days – it blew my mind and I wish I’d seen it sooner (whoops) – if you’re keen – http://caitchock.com/running-and-training-are-not-the-same-thing/

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